Water Bikes

Back in the 1870s, a bicycle-like watercraft was known as a 'water velocipede'. Although we now call these revolutionary craft 'waterbikes' or 'hydrocycles', the concept of propelling a floating craft by bicycle-style pedalling remains the same.

Waterbikes come in many forms with the most popular being a design featuring two pontoons on either side what looks very much like a spinning bike. The rider sits upright on the seat, with their hands on the handlebars and feet on the pedals.…

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Water Bikes
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Back in the 1870s, a bicycle-like watercraft was known as a 'water velocipede'. Although we now call these revolutionary craft 'waterbikes' or 'hydrocycles', the concept of propelling a floating craft by bicycle-style pedalling remains the same.

Waterbikes come in many forms with the most popular being a design featuring two pontoons on either side what looks very much like a spinning bike. The rider sits upright on the seat, with their hands on the handlebars and feet on the pedals. The pontoons are for buoyancy and pedalling turns a small rear propeller that moves you forward. Steering is as easy as turning the handlebars of the bike. Waterbikes offer a cycling experience... on water.

As no previous cycling experience or special skills are required, riding a waterbike is for any person that can reach the pedals (minimum of 5' in height). These craft are stable and easy to steer.

Join a guided tour or hire a waterbike and take the opportunity to see birds and aquatic life from the elevated seat. As they have no motors, these human-powered craft are silent, emission-free, safe and environmentally friendly.

Whether you climb on a waterbike for fun, fitness or a scenic tour, you're in for an enjoyable ride.

Water Bikes Operators